Shrine of Our Lady of Lourdes

The Shrine of Our Lady of Lourdes was built in thanksgiving to God for the light bombing of Blackpool and surrounding areas during the Second World War. 

The Shrine was built between 1955 and1957 and was funded by local parishes and designed by architect Francis Xavier Velarde. It is one of very few post-war churches listed Grade II*.

A perfect, diminutive jewel-like quality that transcends conventional church formulas.

~ List description for The Shrine

What's on

We don't have any events planned here at the moment, but we're open to visitors.

Grid Reference: SD332368

You can download a short guide to The Shrine here.

Getting there

The Shrine of Our Lady of Lourdes stands on Whinney Heys Road, close to Stanley Park and Blackpool Victoria Hospital.

It is difficult to park very close to the chapel, due to double yellow line parking restrictions. There is a multi-storey car park further down Whinney Heys Road.

In the area

Stanley Park is a short walk from the Shrine, it has a visitor centre and an Art Deco cafe; the Friends of Stanley Park organise a range of events including heritage guided tours of the park.

Whinney Heys Road
United Kingdom

Visitors should ring our keyholder in advance to arrange to get access: 01253 865770.


Would you like to visit or use this chapel for an event?

The Shrine of our Lady of Lourdes was built as a war memorial thanksgiving chapel between 1955 and 1957.  It was designed by Francis Xavier Velarde (1897-1960) and its construction was funded by contributions from local parishes.  Velarde built moire than a dozen churches and chapels, all but one of them for Catholics. Velarde was interested in blending historic styles freely in a way that is nevertheless if its time. His designs were thought eccentric by many during his lifetime; today he is highly regarded for his originality and distinctive style.

The Listing description states that the Shrine has  “a perfect, diminutive jewel-like quality that transcends conventional church formulas.” 

The chapel is clad with Portland stone externally and has a copper roof, ornamented with four statues of saints, one at each corner. There is a large scale relief of the Trinity on the facade above the entrance by the sculptor David John. 

A singular building  which combines familiar forms with exotic motifs.

~ The Buildings of England (Pevsner): Lancashire North



A free 2-page guide to The Shrine can be downloaded here.

A first phase of repairs, costing £100,000, was completed in April 2008. This consisted of repairs to the leaking copper roof and re-designing a defective rainwater disposal system.

In 2015, thanks to funding from a number of trusts and foundations, we were able to replace the electrical system which had not been disconnected as unsafe 10 years.

Chapel repair and regeneration support

There is a great deal still to do to bring this wonderful building back to its former glory. We now need to raise approximately £400,000 to complete repairs and introduce new facilities, which will ensure the building can host a wider range of suitable community activities and occasional services of worship.

If you would like to help us to restore the Shrine, please do make a donation or even leave a legacy which will have a lasting and memorable benefit.

The Shrine does not have fixed pews so can be used very flexibly; in recent years it has been used for exhibitions, fashion shows and a range of other events. 

If you would like to hire the Shrine for an event please contact us.



Would you like to visit or use this chapel for an event?